Bill Sage Interview for Wrong Turn

This week we got to speak to Bill Sage about his role in the new reboot of Wrong Turn and it was a really fun interview about how he dealt with playing the bad guy. Also we talk about the cinematography in the film.

AJ:
What got your interest in joining the wrong turn reboot.

Bill Sage:
Oh, so, you know, in, uh, I wasn’t interested at first because I don’t like reboots or remakes or that kind of thing necessarily. Uh, yeah, I got about halfway through the script and it was something really wildly different and, um, and something that I really appreciated and, uh, no, I really, I enjoyed, uh, the very first term, you know, but I, I haven’t seen it since 2004, but when I did I remember liking it very much.

AJ:
Then having the original writer Alan on board with this reboot, did that also persuade you into doing this also?

Bill Sage:
Well, particularly when I, you know, when I got to where it’s really different, uh, and what persuaded me was that, uh, the, the foundation and the, I mean, I’m really playing the villain even though he’s, you know, he has, uh, he really has a point of view is that he, uh, has, uh, he has strong reasons for, um, doing what he does.

AJ:
All right. And when you like, kind of delved into your character, what kinda inspired your performance, or just, how did you approach it?

Bill Sage:
I approach as, imagining a society that at that particular time prior to the civil war, um, descended from, from the people, uh, that decided to do something very different. Um, and they were a multi-racial, uh, group that, um, rejected where the country was going and, um, had had, uh, no, they were, some of them were, were abolitionists and they, you know, they thought that the whole society was going downhill and you can make the argument that that’s how they, that’s how they see. Um, that’s how they see America. That it’s something that it’s a failed system. So they started something on their own and they, uh, they don’t suffer the same diseases. They don’t, uh, nobody goes hungry. Uh they’re self-sufficient and anybody who, who, um, who tries to subvert that suffered badly, you know, you see that.

AJ:
And when you were working with Mike, the director, how was it just seeing his vision come true?

Bill Sage:
Oh, it was delightful really. Cause he’s he’s, he is, he has this childlike enthusiasm that, uh, I mean, so much energy in any wildly creative and able to work with very experienced actors, to ones that, uh, have, have less and, and great with with children. Like the girl plays Lucy, um, you know, he’s just so good at directing a child. And then, um, somebody like, uh, Matthew Modine, you know what I mean? No, sorry. I was really knocked out by him. I really, really enjoyed working with him.

AJ:
And how was it like working with the cinematography team on this? Because the scenery and the case, and sort of just the uniform on terms, just how was it like working with the crew on that?

Bill Sage:
The crew was outstanding that the, well, that’s, it, it was like a dance. It was really, um, they were so good at what they did and, uh, and working with the camera, like particularly without giving anything away, that’s the stuff toward the end and how, you know, very choreographed. And they were, uh, they were very courageous to give me the opportunity to do it in, uh, without cutting right. Do it in one move. Um, and so I don’t know, long story shoe, how, what was it like working with that crew? Like butter I, I don’t, you know, look, I’m not, uh, I, I’m not a big gusher, but I, I really did. I enjoyed everything about this, uh, enjoyed working with, uh, with the cast there’s director and this crew and, uh, um, yeah, it was, it was a good one.

AJ:
Yeah. And with the horns on rhe, you can just kind of feed people, vegetables, while giving them dessert, almost squishy, like layers upon layers of subplot. Is that also what helps you gravitate towards a genre films as well?

Bill Sage:
Yeah. Well, I love the Genre, so, you know, uh, cause I see it as something encompassing, a lot of different kinds of stories, uh, and you know, taking on, um, you know, unconscious anxiety and uh, you know, the idea of, uh, you know, who’s the boogie man and it was kind of, uh, um, if I answered your question, but, um,

AJ:
That was perfect though. Bill thank you for joining us today.

Wrong Turn is available on VOD, Digital, DVD and Blu-ray February 23rd.

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