Adain Bradley interview for Wrong Turn

We at infamous Horrors got to interview the director and some of the cast from the new Wrong Turn reboot. This is a really interesting and insightful interview featuring the actor Adain Bradley.

AJ:
So congratulations on the wrong turn reboot of what gained your interest into joining the cast for this.

Adain:
You know, I had read the script in it, you know, it was a really fresh take on horror. Uh, you know, we have a lot of representation, you know, we started dealing with, um, like real life horrors, you know, it really flipped the idea of horror on its head and, you know, printed a new idea of it. So I definitely jumped on because of that.

AJ:
Right. And that’s kind of what the director said as well when he got the script, is that it’s kind of a fresh take. And did any previous see any of the wrong turn movies before you had kind of signed on to do this reboot, then you watched any of the previous ones?

Adain:
Yeah. So the first one came out when I was about 10 years old. I remember watching it with my dad and then absolutely horrified. I remember the scene very specifically where the body goes up on the table and they just started chopping it up. And for the time it was one of the most horrific things I’d ever seen in my life. Absolutely scarred from that. And then I got the, I got the script for a wrong turn and I was like, Oh my God, is that a movie from when I was little? The one that just ruined me. So I was like, yes, I’m going to, I have to do this movie

AJ:
And like horror movies like this they also have something else to say kind of underneath the layers. Then you find any of that while you’re reading the script for this wrong turn reboot is that also something else you found intriguing?

Adain:
Yes. I, you know, one of the first things I noticed was Alan B. McElroy really brought social horrors into the script, you know, things that we don’t always see, um, in horror films in general, you know, when you start dealing with, you know, misogyny, homophobia, xenophobia, you know, all kinds of stuff, you know, it’s, it was really intense. And I thought it was a really interesting take, especially with, uh, the political white political climate currently kind of dealt with things that we’re dealing with today. So it made it very modern and up-to-date

AJ:
Yeah. And just kind of continuing on that, is that something that like excited you to, like, I can be in this platform with a diverse cast also having this commentary on kind of every yard now, because it is 2021 and we still don’t expect to have these conversations yet. It’s still brought up in everyday life, especially with what happened not too long ago. And that, that may be more relevant with wrong turn, just coming out as well.

Adain:
Right. I mean, with Wrong Turn, definitely, you know, touches on all of that, especially, you know, currently now. Um, but yeah, you know, I, I think initially, you know, it’s always like tricky because you see scripts like that and it can scare a lot of people away, but I definitely saw it as a platform to say, you know, to represent the people that want to be hurt, you know, in the film I played LGBTQ character, you know, and I loved that the film wasn’t, you know, written in a way that it was stereotypical made, it made the characters very normal. That could be your neighbor or your friend or your best friend, anybody, you know, I love that. And I, I wanted to step on that platform and say, you know, we’re all here and it’s okay.

AJ:
Yeah. And I’ve kind of gotten that feeling from watch sooner that straw I’m turned to reboot to that, you know, it kept the characters grounded in a way that none of them are stereotypical. Or It, tried to make their character preachy in that kind of way. Some movies may do and turn the people off, just kind of pushing it in your face where this one didn’t. But outside of that, are you a horror fan at all before you took this movie on?

Adain:
Yeah, so I am actually a huge horror film. Um, currently my favorites are Midsommar I’ve found a lot of inspiration Midsommar. I loved Florence Pugh Um, I found a lot of inspiration in her to bring to Wrong Turn and anything by Ari Arster or currently I’m just currently obsessed.

AJ:
Yeah. And while, and those movies, this wrong turn has kind of been divisive and a lot of the horn community from what I’ve been seeing as well. But how new guns, middle with the critical and crying that you have gotten from this, knowing that it’s a franchise that’s really been out since about the early two thousands and you get a chance to be on the reboot, also and critical acclaim aspect been for you guys so far.

Adain:
You know, it’s been pretty exciting. You know, I, from the moment I signed on, there was such a huge fan base for longterm. You know, people have been watching it all the way since the beginning. So it was really exciting to jump on, but also really daunting. You know, when you’re especially a reboot, you want to, you want the people who have been fans for so long to be excited about what’s happening, but at the same time you want to bring fresh ideas, something new. So it’s always tricky. You know, some people don’t like change at all and some people are completely open. But I think with this new film, I think if people go into the movie theaters, or if you’re not at theaters, if you’re watching it streaming, if you go into it with an open mind and an open heart for something fresh and new for long term, I think you’ll find something that you really love.

AJ:
And I think that helped me just kind of being new to the franchise because like you, I was really young when the first one came out, so I didn’t really grow up with it. I didn’t have that sentimental value that a lot of fans on this franchise had. So I was able to go in with it with an open mind and I guess so disappointing to hear and kind of fans of any franchise just automatically is it, is this regarding any reboot of any kind as to give it try, a fresh take or even if they don’t like it, at least it can be in a new bone direction. And so how did you guys all kind of gather that and knowing that, you know, what some people aren’t going to, you know, want this new approach either way, because they’ve grown up with it, they’re so sentimental to it. But then again, that also gives you a chance to be bold around during the day, like it or not, at least he didn’t try something new with it.

Adain:
Right. So, I mean, when it came, we were filming the film and it came up a lot, you know, it’s like how to, how are the cannibals going to get tied in? You know, that is the basis of a film, but at the end of the day, horror films are really, really, really smart fans. You know, they can figure out anything. So the way that Mike P Nelson and Alan did however, I did, um, what they did was they pulled out, they traded, we’ll say they traded the cannibals for food for thought. We a lot to think about, you know, a lot to like, you know, have opinions about any, you know, find representation or, you know, find things that you love and findings that you hate in the film compared to just appeasing, just, you know, one group of people, you know, we wanted everybody representation in the film and of course, you know, it’s going to stir the pot, but I mean, at the end of the day, the film can mean a lot. If you just go with an open mind, you know? Right.

AJ:
Well, Adrian, thank you so much for joining us at Infamous Horrors today, it’s been fun talking to you.

Adrian:
Thank you so much. I appreciate your time and have a great day. You too.

Wrong Turn is available on VOD, Digital, DVD and Blu-ray February 23rd.

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