Jacob Chase interview for Come Play

We had the fantastic opportunity to speak with Jacob Chase the director of the awesome Come Play which is currently out now. We also speak about the effects of autism in movies and in horror in general. Enjoy!!!



AJ:So Jacob, how it come play come about?

Jacob Chase:
Oh, uh, well, you know, come play started as a short film I made called Larry actually, um, which was this super short five minutes, uh, just sort of experiment of creating, uh, a fear and an atmosphere, um, in a shorter amount of time. Uh, and, but it introduced this, this character of Larry this monster and, and, you know, I was fortunate enough to get the opportunities to expand that into a feature film with, with ambulance, uh, which was an amazing experience. Uh, and, and yeah, I, I’m so excited. I, I guess there’s got to make the feature film version



AJ:
And, uh, how was the autism thing, like kind of incorporated into the film from your perspective? Cause if somebody that’s on the spectrum of autism, like I am, I appreciated the fact that anyone’s incorporate an income play. So how did you and the provider of come play kind of get that in, in the script.

Jacob Chase:
Yeah. Well, thank you for saying that. Um, you know, for me, it was also very important. I, my wife actually works with kids on the spectrum, so I’ve had sort of a window into this, into that community for many years. Um, and, and it has long been something that I’d wanted to write into a movie, you know, a character who is on the spectrum, but, but a film that is, is sort of about that in a way, you know, it’s just part of who he is as a character. Um, I thought that was important. And when I was coming up with what the complaint feature would be, you know, I started thinking about sort of who would be the family that would be kind of haunted in the worst way by a monster that comes at you through technology, because, you know, in horror movies, you want to kind of terrorize the family at the center, uh, as much as possible, um, as much as it sort of pains you to do that as a writer.



Jacob Chase:
Uh, and, and so I, I sort of combined the, the sort of things I wanted to do and, and thought of this young boy with autism who’s non-verbal and sort of needs some devices to communicate with his family and, and sort of longing for connection. Um, and it became a great jumping off point for me. And, and in the process, you know, I, I did a ton of research both on my own while I was writing, but then with the whole cast, uh, we met with, you know, a bunch of kids on the spectrum. There was this amazing young, young man named Sam who, um, is, is, uh, you know, has autism. And he actually was not verbal like, like Oliver when he was a kid. And so he would sort of read the script with me, telling me what I was getting wrong and, and what I was doing. Right. And it was just a process of continuing to build up the character, um, you know, into someone that felt real and, and also, you know, felt like, uh, appropriate for the movie. And, and also we could, you know, he could be the hero that we all want to root for.

AJ:
And I love that how you actually rent to real and authentic people on the autism spectrum and dealing with autism on your casting and that must’ve been, um, really eye opening to go through and how, when you cast and the boy, how was it like having and Gillian Jacob’s come on, she seemed really game toward it for us in this movie as well.



Jacob Chase:
Oh, thank you. Uh, yeah, Gillian was, uh, fantastic. I mean, she was so, um, excited about the, the script and the opportunity to play someone that was maybe not exactly like characters she’s played in the past. Um, she had a real empathy for, for all of these characters, which is something I really look for in casting is, is characters that have empathy for who they’re playing. Um, even though, you know, her character sort of does and says some things that, that are, um, really hurtful to all of her throughout the film, that she’s sort of a struggling parent herself, you know, you, you have to be able to relate with the character as the accurate to a certain degree. Um, and you know, Gillian’s also a, uh, director herself, actually she’s done some documentaries and some short films that are really great. And so, you know, she really got excited about the process of all the fun things I wanted to do on set, like have a big practical nine foot tall puppets, you know, walking around, um, that kind of stuff.



AJ:
Yeah. And how was it working with the visual effects on come play? Because they weren’t some good visuals that you had within technology and everything incorporated in the film. Yeah,

Jacob Chase:
It was a blast. I mean, it was a big combination of different companies and ideas put together. So, so Larry, the monster is primarily a big practical puppet created by the Jim Henson creature shop, which, you know, having grown up on movies with practical effects and especially loving labyrinth and the dark crystal, like getting to work with those, um, puppeteers and designers was, was really so much fun. Um, and then on top of that, we had a couple of great VFX companies who helped with the augmentation of the puppet and deleting puppeteers. Um, you know, it’s very funny in the, in the sort of dailies of the movie before all the visual effects were finished, you know, their shots with Larry, where you can see sort of these puppeteers in green suits walking around behind Larry. Uh, and, and as soon as you erase all of a sudden, it just brings the whole thing to life and an even better cooler way.



AJ:
And I always bring this up with people that bring up the Jim Henson company when they’ve worked on horror films. Have you ever seen the TV so called a channel zero season one?

Jacob Chase:
I have not watched the whole season, but I have seen, I think it was like the first two episodes. I see,

AJ:
Because that is Jim Henson nightmare fuel on cocaine, man.

Jacob Chase:
I love it. I got to watch more of it then.

AJ:
And what was some of the fondest memories you had on set filming? Come play?

Jacob Chase:
That’s a good question. I mean, the whole experience was pretty amazing. I would say, you know, one experience that really stood out to me is we actually filmed this movie over all the weekend and edgy, uh, the young boy who plays all over, you know, he wasn’t able to trick or treat that year because he was on set filming and I felt really bad for him. And so what we did was we had the costume department make his like favorite character into a costume. And we had, um, all of the, the different departments set up like little trick or treat stations and, and the grip department even made a haunted house and one of the grip trucks, uh, so w and we all dressed up, like, it was just so much fun, uh, being on set that day, because we were all kind of trying to scare each other. And we all had funny outfits on, and as she ended up having a blast, which made me very happy.

AJ:
Oh, and that’s awesome. That must have been so much fun from the entire cats too, to watch that happen. Yeah. All right. Well, thank you so much for joining us at infamous Horrors today, it was really fun speaking with you, Jacob.

Jacob: You as well AJ, have a great day.

Leave a Reply

© InfamousHorrors.com - 2020

Up ↑